• Boy Thrown Off Mall of America Balcony 'Continuing to Fight' for His Life

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  • A 75-year-old man has been killed by the large flightless bird he owned after he fell on his property in Florida.Police found the man badly wounded by a cassowary when they were called to his property, where the victim kept exotic animals, on Friday.Cassowaries are known as the “world’s most dangerous bird”, according to San Diego Zoo.Alachua County Sheriff Department said the man was probably injured by the bird’s 4-inch, dagger-like claws.Police are investigating the incident but say initial information suggests it was a “tragic accident”.The victim, named as Marvin Hajos, was taken to hospital by paramedics, where he later died from his injuries.He was reportedly breeding the birds, which are native to Australia and New Guinea.“It looks like it was accidental,” deputy chief Jeff Taylor told the Gainesville Sun newspaper.“My understanding is that the gentleman was in the vicinity of the bird and at some point fell. When he fell, he was attacked.”Police added that the cassowary involved in the attack “remains secured on private property at this time.”A woman who identified herself as the victim’s partner told the Gainesville Sun that he had died “doing what he loved” but chose not to make any further statement.Cassowaries are similar to emus and are among the largest bird species in the world, weighing up to 60kg and reaching up to 6ft in height.San Diego Zoo said cassowaries “can slice open any predator or potential threat with a single swift kick”, due to their long claws.The birds are not traditionally raised in the US but are sought after by collectors.The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission lists the cassowary as Class II wildlife which can “pose a danger to people” and require a permit for ownership.Agencies contributed to this report

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  • We're not sure what's funnier: his story or the company's response.

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  • The Battle of Iwo Jima, which began Feb. 19, 1945, was one of the bloodiest battles in Marine Corps history, as former Cpl. Don Graves knows firsthand and will never forget.He'll also never forget the time a Japanese soldier smelled hot chocolate being brewed near him and called out for him to bring him some. The moment, as he recounted in a video posted to the Marine Corps Facebook page Tuesday, was almost like the Christmas truce that wasn't.Sitting in a fox hole with two other Marines on the fifth week of the battle, he said, Graves decided to make himself some hot chocolate. "So my other two buddies, they said, 'make enough for three of us.'"So there he was, slicing up his chocolate ration with a Ka-Bar and chopping it into a powder. Then he cut off a piece of his Composition C2 demolition charge and used it to light a flame."Just a nice little fire going, and we sat there and we watched it," he said. "And then all of sudden I could smell hot chocolate."Of course, so could everyone else, including enemy soldiers.A few minutes later, he heard a Japanese voice calling out to him, "hey Marine, very good chocoletto. You bring chocoletto here.""If you want chocoletto, you come here and get it," he said back. "He says, 'oh no, you bring here,'" Graves said, laughing."There's humor in combat. Every man that's been in combat knows that sometimes funny things happen."

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  • Does this mean that I have to buy a bucket hat now?

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  • Police booked both mother and son for disorderly conduct and other charges after the incident, which began with their dog running around the store.

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  • "I used a word that I know is extremely hurtful to a lot of people," Danielle Ford said in her apology.

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